thereligionofgolf:

Byron Nelson, President Eisenhower, Ben Hogan & Clifford Roberts. 

(via retrocampaigns)

ourpresidents:

President Nixon and Bob Hope playing golf in the Oval Office.  4/20/73.

(via retrocampaigns)

retrocampaigns:

The Johnson Landslide
The “Solid South" could reliably be counted on to vote Democratic - that is, in the interests of white men, from the end of the post-Civil War period until about 1948, when the Democratic Party began its gradual shift toward progressive causes and, in particular, support for the civil rights of African-Americans. In 1960, not even John Kennedy’s selection of Texan Lyndon Johnson as Vice President could save Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida from falling into the GOP’s hands.
By President Johnson’s election bid in 1964, he had already signed the controversial Civil Rights Act (“I think we just delivered the South to the Republican Party for a long time to come,” Johnson said), and, in November, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina would for the first time in decades vote Republican.
This shift, of course, did not go unnoticed by the GOP, who would at times appeal to racist tendencies of some southern strongholds to help elect Republican candidates.
The Johnson Landslide - Universal Newsreel Volume 37, Issue 89, 11/05/1964, via the National Archives, todaysdocument
retrocampaigns:

The Johnson Landslide
The “Solid South" could reliably be counted on to vote Democratic - that is, in the interests of white men, from the end of the post-Civil War period until about 1948, when the Democratic Party began its gradual shift toward progressive causes and, in particular, support for the civil rights of African-Americans. In 1960, not even John Kennedy’s selection of Texan Lyndon Johnson as Vice President could save Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida from falling into the GOP’s hands.
By President Johnson’s election bid in 1964, he had already signed the controversial Civil Rights Act (“I think we just delivered the South to the Republican Party for a long time to come,” Johnson said), and, in November, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina would for the first time in decades vote Republican.
This shift, of course, did not go unnoticed by the GOP, who would at times appeal to racist tendencies of some southern strongholds to help elect Republican candidates.
The Johnson Landslide - Universal Newsreel Volume 37, Issue 89, 11/05/1964, via the National Archives, todaysdocument
retrocampaigns:

The Johnson Landslide
The “Solid South" could reliably be counted on to vote Democratic - that is, in the interests of white men, from the end of the post-Civil War period until about 1948, when the Democratic Party began its gradual shift toward progressive causes and, in particular, support for the civil rights of African-Americans. In 1960, not even John Kennedy’s selection of Texan Lyndon Johnson as Vice President could save Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida from falling into the GOP’s hands.
By President Johnson’s election bid in 1964, he had already signed the controversial Civil Rights Act (“I think we just delivered the South to the Republican Party for a long time to come,” Johnson said), and, in November, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina would for the first time in decades vote Republican.
This shift, of course, did not go unnoticed by the GOP, who would at times appeal to racist tendencies of some southern strongholds to help elect Republican candidates.
The Johnson Landslide - Universal Newsreel Volume 37, Issue 89, 11/05/1964, via the National Archives, todaysdocument
retrocampaigns:

The Johnson Landslide
The “Solid South" could reliably be counted on to vote Democratic - that is, in the interests of white men, from the end of the post-Civil War period until about 1948, when the Democratic Party began its gradual shift toward progressive causes and, in particular, support for the civil rights of African-Americans. In 1960, not even John Kennedy’s selection of Texan Lyndon Johnson as Vice President could save Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida from falling into the GOP’s hands.
By President Johnson’s election bid in 1964, he had already signed the controversial Civil Rights Act (“I think we just delivered the South to the Republican Party for a long time to come,” Johnson said), and, in November, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina would for the first time in decades vote Republican.
This shift, of course, did not go unnoticed by the GOP, who would at times appeal to racist tendencies of some southern strongholds to help elect Republican candidates.
The Johnson Landslide - Universal Newsreel Volume 37, Issue 89, 11/05/1964, via the National Archives, todaysdocument
retrocampaigns:

The Johnson Landslide
The “Solid South" could reliably be counted on to vote Democratic - that is, in the interests of white men, from the end of the post-Civil War period until about 1948, when the Democratic Party began its gradual shift toward progressive causes and, in particular, support for the civil rights of African-Americans. In 1960, not even John Kennedy’s selection of Texan Lyndon Johnson as Vice President could save Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida from falling into the GOP’s hands.
By President Johnson’s election bid in 1964, he had already signed the controversial Civil Rights Act (“I think we just delivered the South to the Republican Party for a long time to come,” Johnson said), and, in November, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina would for the first time in decades vote Republican.
This shift, of course, did not go unnoticed by the GOP, who would at times appeal to racist tendencies of some southern strongholds to help elect Republican candidates.
The Johnson Landslide - Universal Newsreel Volume 37, Issue 89, 11/05/1964, via the National Archives, todaysdocument
retrocampaigns:

The Johnson Landslide
The “Solid South" could reliably be counted on to vote Democratic - that is, in the interests of white men, from the end of the post-Civil War period until about 1948, when the Democratic Party began its gradual shift toward progressive causes and, in particular, support for the civil rights of African-Americans. In 1960, not even John Kennedy’s selection of Texan Lyndon Johnson as Vice President could save Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida from falling into the GOP’s hands.
By President Johnson’s election bid in 1964, he had already signed the controversial Civil Rights Act (“I think we just delivered the South to the Republican Party for a long time to come,” Johnson said), and, in November, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina would for the first time in decades vote Republican.
This shift, of course, did not go unnoticed by the GOP, who would at times appeal to racist tendencies of some southern strongholds to help elect Republican candidates.
The Johnson Landslide - Universal Newsreel Volume 37, Issue 89, 11/05/1964, via the National Archives, todaysdocument
retrocampaigns:

The Johnson Landslide
The “Solid South" could reliably be counted on to vote Democratic - that is, in the interests of white men, from the end of the post-Civil War period until about 1948, when the Democratic Party began its gradual shift toward progressive causes and, in particular, support for the civil rights of African-Americans. In 1960, not even John Kennedy’s selection of Texan Lyndon Johnson as Vice President could save Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida from falling into the GOP’s hands.
By President Johnson’s election bid in 1964, he had already signed the controversial Civil Rights Act (“I think we just delivered the South to the Republican Party for a long time to come,” Johnson said), and, in November, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina would for the first time in decades vote Republican.
This shift, of course, did not go unnoticed by the GOP, who would at times appeal to racist tendencies of some southern strongholds to help elect Republican candidates.
The Johnson Landslide - Universal Newsreel Volume 37, Issue 89, 11/05/1964, via the National Archives, todaysdocument
retrocampaigns:

The Johnson Landslide
The “Solid South" could reliably be counted on to vote Democratic - that is, in the interests of white men, from the end of the post-Civil War period until about 1948, when the Democratic Party began its gradual shift toward progressive causes and, in particular, support for the civil rights of African-Americans. In 1960, not even John Kennedy’s selection of Texan Lyndon Johnson as Vice President could save Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida from falling into the GOP’s hands.
By President Johnson’s election bid in 1964, he had already signed the controversial Civil Rights Act (“I think we just delivered the South to the Republican Party for a long time to come,” Johnson said), and, in November, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina would for the first time in decades vote Republican.
This shift, of course, did not go unnoticed by the GOP, who would at times appeal to racist tendencies of some southern strongholds to help elect Republican candidates.
The Johnson Landslide - Universal Newsreel Volume 37, Issue 89, 11/05/1964, via the National Archives, todaysdocument
retrocampaigns:

The Johnson Landslide
The “Solid South" could reliably be counted on to vote Democratic - that is, in the interests of white men, from the end of the post-Civil War period until about 1948, when the Democratic Party began its gradual shift toward progressive causes and, in particular, support for the civil rights of African-Americans. In 1960, not even John Kennedy’s selection of Texan Lyndon Johnson as Vice President could save Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida from falling into the GOP’s hands.
By President Johnson’s election bid in 1964, he had already signed the controversial Civil Rights Act (“I think we just delivered the South to the Republican Party for a long time to come,” Johnson said), and, in November, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina would for the first time in decades vote Republican.
This shift, of course, did not go unnoticed by the GOP, who would at times appeal to racist tendencies of some southern strongholds to help elect Republican candidates.
The Johnson Landslide - Universal Newsreel Volume 37, Issue 89, 11/05/1964, via the National Archives, todaysdocument
retrocampaigns:

The Johnson Landslide
The “Solid South" could reliably be counted on to vote Democratic - that is, in the interests of white men, from the end of the post-Civil War period until about 1948, when the Democratic Party began its gradual shift toward progressive causes and, in particular, support for the civil rights of African-Americans. In 1960, not even John Kennedy’s selection of Texan Lyndon Johnson as Vice President could save Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida from falling into the GOP’s hands.
By President Johnson’s election bid in 1964, he had already signed the controversial Civil Rights Act (“I think we just delivered the South to the Republican Party for a long time to come,” Johnson said), and, in November, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina would for the first time in decades vote Republican.
This shift, of course, did not go unnoticed by the GOP, who would at times appeal to racist tendencies of some southern strongholds to help elect Republican candidates.
The Johnson Landslide - Universal Newsreel Volume 37, Issue 89, 11/05/1964, via the National Archives, todaysdocument

retrocampaigns:

The Johnson Landslide

The “Solid South" could reliably be counted on to vote Democratic - that is, in the interests of white men, from the end of the post-Civil War period until about 1948, when the Democratic Party began its gradual shift toward progressive causes and, in particular, support for the civil rights of African-Americans. In 1960, not even John Kennedy’s selection of Texan Lyndon Johnson as Vice President could save Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida from falling into the GOP’s hands.

By President Johnson’s election bid in 1964, he had already signed the controversial Civil Rights Act (“I think we just delivered the South to the Republican Party for a long time to come,” Johnson said), and, in November, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina would for the first time in decades vote Republican.

This shift, of course, did not go unnoticed by the GOP, who would at times appeal to racist tendencies of some southern strongholds to help elect Republican candidates.

The Johnson Landslide - Universal Newsreel Volume 37, Issue 89, 11/05/1964, via the National Archives, todaysdocument

mallhistories:

Charles Guiteau shot President Garfield on July 2, 1881 at the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Station on the National Mall. Guiteau shot Garfield because he had been denied a political appointment which he believed he deserved. Guiteau was tried, found guilty, and sentenced to death by hanging on June 30, 1882. Garfield eventually died from complications from the gunshot wound.

Learn more at Histories of the National Mall.

(via retrocampaigns)

QOTD #2

  • Patron: Can you direct me to a shipbuilder?
  • Me: You can probably find someone to design a boat for you out in Marina del Rey? I can look up some names.
  • Patron: I need to build a 190 foot ship.
  • Me: That's a little too big for Marina del Rey. You would need to go down to the Port of L.A. in San Pedro.
  • Patron: There aren't any ships that size docked near here.
  • Me: We're a little too far inland for 190 foot long ships.
  • Patron: Are you sure? So are there big ships down at the port?
  • Me: Yes. Very big ships.
  • Patron: I shall have to look sometime.

QOTD

  • Patron: How much sleep does everybody get per day?
  • Me: For what age? In what area?
  • Patron: Everybody. Everywhere.
  • Me: I don't think anybody keeps track of how much everybody sleeps. There are a lot of people in the world.
  • Patron: The last library told me that too.
  • Me: Maybe because it's true. Sleep patterns vary widely by age and health condition.
  • Patron: Really?
  • Me: Yep
  • Patron: Wow.

The Dodgers and pay TV battle has been fought before

By Larry Stewart in the LA Times on April 1, 1997: (some paragraphs snipped)

When Fox Sports West 2 was launched in January, only a few Southern
California cable companies—and no major ones—offered the new
regional sports network.

The conjecture, though, was that other companies would come around
before the start of the baseball season because of Fox Sports West 2’s
40-game Dodger package that begins with today’s season opener.

But cable operators, as a group, are resisting Fox Sports West and its
parent company, Fox Sports Net. There have been no significant cable
deals regarding Fox Sports West 2 since the spinoff channel was
launched Jan. 27.

Fox Sports has since lowered its asking price for Fox Sports West 2
from 75 cents a subscriber per month to 60-65 cents. There has still
been resistance, even though Fox believes the price is fair. Fox also
believes cable operators will eventually give in, or risk losing
subscribers.

That could be the case, since DirecTV began carrying Fox Sports West 2 last Friday. Viewers can choose that option and get the Dodgers’ first
basic cable package—35 homes games, five road games—plus the
Clippers, Mighty Ducks, daily horse racing, high school sports and all
the other programming on Fox Sports West 2.

What’s more, Fox Sports West began a heavily advertised promotion with DirecTV on March 21 that allows consumers to buy a digital satellite
system (DSS) for as little as $49.95, counting a $200 rebate from
DirecTV and an instant $50 discount from Fox. In most cases, however,
consumers need more than one receiver, which adds to the cost.

After buying a DSS system with one, two or more receivers, there is a
monthly fee of $29.95 for DirecTV’s basic service, which includes Fox
Sports West 2. It’s one of more than a dozen new channels DirecTV
added to its basic package Friday. Another is Chicago superstation
WGN.

Most consumers have chosen to add premium packages to DirecTV’s basic service, and that’s where the monthly cost can get expensive. An
average DirecTV subscriber pays $65-$80 a month.

Most cable operators say they aren’t overly concerned about the
Fox-DirecTV promotion.

"We’ve had virtually no response to it," said David Auger, general
manager of Time-Warner cable in the San Fernando Valley.

Others say it has done more harm than good and has set back
negotiations. One operator complained about the anti-cable tone in the
newspaper ads, calling the wording “out of line.” Another said Fox was
"cutting off its nose to spite its face" and was making a mistake by
trying to force operators to pay for a channel they never asked for.

The cable industry considers DSS little more than a thorn in its side. (Emphasis mine)
There are more than 60 million cable households in the United States,
and DirecTV, the major player in the fledgling DSS industry, is in
only about 2 1/2 million.

However, DirecTV has been cutting into cable’s business ever since the
first DSS unit was sold in Jackson, Miss., on June 17, 1994.

"Two-thirds of our new subscribers coming on now are from cable
territories,” said Eddy Hartenstein, the president of DirecTV.

About DirecTV’s deal to carry Fox Sports West 2, Hartenstein said, “We
just felt it is important to give our subscribers a complete package,
and without Fox Sports West 2, we wouldn’t be providing a complete
package.”

Even with the DirecTV deal, Fox still has to win over cable operators.

"Some deals are imminent," said Kitty Cohen, the general manager of
Fox Sports West.

Bill Rosendahl, senior vice president of public affairs for Century
Communications, said, “We were all bludgeoned with this
gun-to-the-head strategy when we were first hit with this a couple of
months ago, and as an industry we’re all concerned with the bottom
line and trying to keep spiraling programming costs down.

"But all of that said, I believe reasonable people, in dealing with
something as important as one’s sporting interests, can get through
all of that. I’m optimistic that eventually something good will come
out of all of this.”

Fox at least has made a gesture to appease fans who want to see the
Dodgers’ season opener against Philadelphia but don’t have a ticket.
Fox has set up jumbo screens and bleachers at five Southland locations
where the Fox Sports West 2 telecast will be shown.

Those locations: Century City Entertainment Center, City Corp. Plaza
downtown, the Warner Center in Woodland Hills, Planet Hollywood at
South Coast Plaza and the Ontario Mills shopping center.

"We’re making the attempt to be fan friendly," Cohen said.

But it seems no matter what Fox Sports West and Fox Sports Net do—and
that includes filing an antitrust suit against Disney for its alleged
role in influencing cable operators—nobody flinches.

This dispute, which has viewers caught in the middle, appears to be
one that isn’t going to go away any time soon. (Emphasis mine again)

Casey, like all cats, likes to be dramatically lit